Book Review: A Teenager’s Perspective on Food Restrictions by Erica

How does one define a typical teenager?

One imagines they are full of hopes and dreams, hang out with their friends, go on  dates, attend the prom…hope they ‘fit in’.

Hey…I remember the teenaged years. Not a time I would gladly go back to but I understand that feeling of wanting to be ‘just like everyone else’ all the same.

With my curly, unruly hair with ‘frizzies’, freckled pale skin that burned in the sun and breathing issues that limited my ability to join actively in outdoor activities (undiagnosed asthma)...I remember that feeling of ‘standing out’ in a crowd.

Did I want to talk about it?  Not particularly.

Meet Erica.  Erica is an 18 year old teenager with hopes and dreams, loves playing baseball, hanging out with her friends and strives to ‘fit in’.

You see, Erica lives with chronic health issues…food sensitivities, joint inflammation, and cystic acne…and she wants to talk about it.

Erica writes a blog…Edible Attitudes A Teenagers Perspective on Food Restrictions. In fact, Erica has written a book about her journey with her chronic health issues…

A Teenager’s Perspective on Food Restrictions - A Practical Guide to Keep from Going Crazy”.

Perhaps it is the memory of my teenage years of trying to ‘fit in’ or the fact that I have two teenaged boys with food allergies that make them ‘stand out’ that Erica’s need to share her story resonates with me.

My boys are not keen to talk about their multiple food allergy experiences but here is a girl willing to put herself out there and share her chronic health experiences in order to help others who may be following a similar journey.

Erica states, “I hope this book encourages you through your journey as much as writing it has done for me.”

Erica’s grasp on the importance of her health seems to guide her.  She states, “When you take ownership of your health and are self-motivated, you are more willing to follow your diet restrictions, because you know why you are choosing to eat this way.”

Erica understands everyone’s journey is unique…but she is willing to share with others the ups and downs of her journey to give others hope with their own.

As a parent with two teenaged boys with food restrictions of their own who are not keen to share their feelings on the topic…I enjoyed reading about food restrictions from the point of view of a teenager living in today’s world.

Erica is offering readers of my blog the opportunity to purchase a PDF version of her book, “A Teenager’s Perspective on Food Restrictions - A Practical Guide to Keep from Going Crazy“, for only $1!

Click here for a link to the PDF version and use the coupon code, CHRONICLES (all caps).

Enjoy!

 

 

I Attended My First Toronto Anaphylaxis Education Group Meeting, May 27 2014

One of the best things I learned at Anaphylaxis Canada’s 7th Annual Community Conference was the Toronto Anaphylaxis Education Group (TAEG).

Last night,  May 27, 2014, I attended my very first Toronto Anaphylaxis Education Group Meeting…why did it take me so long?

Anyone living with anaphylaxis in the Toronto area should really check them out…great support network!

A few of the people there I recognized from Anaphylaxis Canada’s 7th Annual Community Conference. Click here for my post on attending the event.

The meeting I attended, What’s in the food? Labeling/Dining Out, was very informative.

Marilyn Allen, Foodservice Consultant for Anaphylaxis Canada, gave a thorough overview of food labeling in Canada and introduced the now available employee training program available through Anaphylaxis Canada in collaboration with TrainCan Inc….Allergen Training For the Foodservice and Food Retail Industry.

Anaphylaxis Canada states, “The program covers the basics of food allergy and anaphylaxis (what it is, signs and symptoms, and emergency plan) and teaches managers the principles necessary to develop allergen risk management procedures that are specific to their own company’s environment.  These include ways to identify and manage risk and how to avoid cross-contamination through proper storage, handling, cooking, and serving practices.”

I will definitely be contacting the Foodservices Department at the University that Michael chooses to make them aware of this fantastic allergen training opportunity.

What else did I learn?

-ALWAYS READ THE INGREDIENT LIST of pre-packaged food for food allergens before you purchase, before you open and before you consume.
-The Canadian Food Inspection Agency’s (CFIA) labelling requirements states, “All labelling information that is provided on food labels or in advertisements, as required by legislation, must be accurate, truthful and not misleading.” Click here for more information.
-Voluntary statements on pre-packaged foods such as ‘may contain’ and ‘made in a faculty…’ are just that…voluntary. ALWAYS READ THE INGREDIENT LIST.
-If a restaurant is unable to tell you the ingredients in a meal…do not eat there.
-If you suspect that you have had an allergic reaction to a product…contact the company, contact the CFIA and keep the product for scientific analysis.

Also in attendance…Sherry Mahon, President of Lily Safe Foods.  Sherry is the grandmother of Lily who has food allergies.  Sherry is in the process of conducting an anonymous survey on her website for input on her new business venture…Lily Safe Foods. 

Sherry states on her website, “Lily Safe Foods is a start up business that will provide people who suffer from the top 10 food allergens (dairy, egg, soy, wheat, fish, shellfish, mustard, sesame, tree nuts or peanuts) the option of purchasing single serving meals in a pouch that are delicious, safe, convenient and since they go through a “canning” process will last in your cupboard for up to one year.” 

Perhaps a great option for my university bound son with multiple food allergies.

The Toronto Anaphylaxis Education Group’s list of meeting dates will be available in the summer.

Hope to see you at the next meeting!

 

 

 

Anaphylaxis Canada’s 7th Annual Community Conference, May 10, 2014

May is Food Allergy Awareness Month…what better way to spend it than at a day dedicated to food allergies.

On Saturday, May 10, 2014,  that is just where you would have found me…attending Anaphylaxis Canada’s 7th Annual Community Conference in Markham, Ontario, Canada.

What a day! I hardly know where the time went…so fast, I even forgot to run out and grab my lunch from the car!

At the morning parent session…I think I may have been one of the oldest mom’s in the group with a son with multiple food allergies ready to graduate from high school.

My table of 6 parents, including myself, consisted of a couple of mom’s with a child with food allergies entering JK, a mom of a girl in Grade 3 and parents of another child who I think was also in Grade 3.

The morning was all about “Partnering And Planning With Your School”.

The registering of one’s child with anaphylaxis in the school system was a big topic. Understanding the law and responsibilities of the school, providing resources on your child with anaphylaxis’ allergy management, creating an Action Plan and effective communication tools for parents were all covered.

Complete with a very ‘Oscar worthy’ role-play example performance!

All the information regarding the morning session can be found at The Toronto Anaphylaxis Education Group (TAEG).  Click here.

I really liked the ‘electronic binder information’ they have all ready for one to download…  I wish I had that resource way back when!

The afternoon session, “Managing food allergies:  Working together for a safer future” also flew by.

Great speakers from Anaphylaxis CanadaKyle Dine and three members of the Youth Advisory Panel from Why Risk It? discussed and answered questions on bullying and Laurie Harada, Executive Director of Anaphylaxis Canada moderated a great discussion on food labelling.

Dr. Adelle Atkinson’s , MD, FRCPC talk on “A Buffet of truths and myths about food allergy” easily kept the attention of all with her wit and humour.

Many exhibitors waited in the hallway for us all to descend upon them during our morning and afternoon breaks and lunch.

Exhibitors…such as Allerject (I picked up some posters and an Allerject trainer for my boys’ high school), EpiPen (I picked up some posters and an EpiPen trainer for my boys’ high school), Allergic Living Magazine (I happily subscribed for another 2 years), Medic Alert, and SunButter (my favourite being the Organic SunButter I asked if they could please make a crunchy version!)...just to name a few.

So what did I learn at this event?

1)  I was inspired to pick up as much information as I could from the exhibitors to bring back to my boys’ high school to present at the School Council Meeting on May 14, 2014.

2)  It made me realize, my boys’ high school website needs to contain information about registering a student with anaphylaxis.  Adding such information would be a welcoming sight for parents registering a student with anaphylaxis…the Principal agreed.

My experience at the high school level has taught me that not all parents feel the need to inform their child’s high school of their anaphylaxis.  Shocking I know!

By including anaphylaxis information on my boys’ high school website, I hope to bring awareness and encourage all parents of high school children with anaphylaxis to notify the Principal of their child’s anaphylaxis.  Set up a meeting with the Principal, review and fill out an Action Plan and provide the high school with an auto-injector for the office.

Continuing to be advocates at the high school level sets a good example for our children with anaphylaxis…for in only 4 years, you will be passing the torch!

 

 

 

It’s Been A Journey Preparing For University With Multiple Food Allergies And Eczema

My eldest son, Michael, will be heading off to university in the fall of 2014. He will be one amongst the many youths eager, excited and yet, a little anxious to start a new chapter of their lives.

Michael’s university experience, however, will have an added layer. What will set him apart is not his average, his sense of adventure or his charm…Michael has multiple food allergies…dairy, egg, beef, lamb, fish, shellfish, peanut/tree nuts, sesame, mustard, and raspberries.

Michael is about to embark on a journey that has been in development since he was born.

As parents, we nurture our children, teach them right from wrong, provide them with choices, watch them fall, help them find ‘their feet’ and pick themselves back up again, guide them, encourage them to learn from their mistakes, remain a strong support system, love them through out it all and then hope that all the experiences they have encountered in their lifetime with us has prepared them to meet the ‘real world’.

For Michael, and many other children, personal medical conditions add another element to their ‘life’s journey’.  An element that ‘stirs the pot’ so to speak. Leaving parents and children ‘grasping for straws’ to find their way.  I look back now and wonder how either of us survived the displacement…it was a time in my life full of confusion.

However, to look at Michael now…I know, as parents, we must have done something right. :)

In my eyes, the ‘Grade School Years’ were the hardest…Michael suffered greatly from eczema. (Although, he would argue that having food allergies were worse, but then again, his memory of the eczema years is murky…thank goodness!)

At the time, I felt his food allergies seemed manageable in comparison to the many bouts of infection he endured.  His food allergies ‘took the back seat’ until his eczema started to clear around Grade 7.  Until then, I felt tortured by the fact that there seemed to be ‘no method to the madness’ of his eczema.

My eyes would well, my throat would constrict as I held back the tears while I bathed and creamed his wounded body. 

Below are a list of a few of the posts I have written concerning Michael’s journey with his food allergies and eczema:
Click here for a post I wrote titled, “Talking About Atopic Dermatitis”.
Click here for a post I wrote titled, “Suffocating With Multiple Food Allergies and Atopic Dermatitis: Taking a Breathe In Scotland.”
Click here for a post I wrote titled, “Hockey Dominates Atopic Dermatitis and Asthma”.

During those turbulent years, I would find as many distractions as I could to keep Michael from scratching his already weakened skin…reading, games, puzzles and lots of Barney videos to keep him occupied and entranced.

Once school started, warm classrooms and stress increased his ‘itchiness’ making it harder for him to concentrate.  For many years, Michael and I would sit after school to review the day’s work and practice in a supplementary work book. Breaks consisting of sitting in front of a fan or sticking his head outdoors to cool down were often.

All I can remember at that time was how imperative it was to me that he learn the ‘basics of reading, writing and arithmetic’. I worried that the ‘window of opportunity’ for learning these ‘basics’ would pass him by and he would spend the rest of his educational life ‘catching up’.

I emphasized the fact that everything he was learning was needed for his ‘journey of life’.  He needed to ‘pack’ all that he was learning in a ‘suitcase’ to bring along with him.  No matter how much he may or may not be enjoying the work…he needed to ‘pack it’.

As he got older, I would review what he had ‘packed’ proving just how important he needed each and every step of his learning. For example, knowing how to add helps with subtracting…just as knowing one’s multiplication tables makes division that much easier. Over the years, my metaphor of a ‘suitcase’ became a symbol of his accomplishments.

Michael struggled to do well in school but it wasn’t until around Grade 7 that everything fell into place for him. As his eczema started to heal, he started to sleep through the night. This in turn allowed him to focus better in school and that is when the ‘light bulb’ went off. Everything started to make sense to him…as if the items in his ‘suitcase’ were finally coming together.

The desire and ability to do well finally came together for him. He graduated Grade 8 with Honours and was the recipient of the Christian Spirit  Award.

The common thread throughout our journey has been hope

…the hope that Michael’s choices would not be controlled by his eczema and food allergies.
…t
he hope that his eczema and food allergies would act as a catalyst for learning compassion, building a strong sense of sense, confidence and esteem.
…the hope that he would one day outgrow his eczema and food allergies.
…the hope that he would see his own potential and strive to reach his goals.

So here we are now…Michael in his final year of high school. His ‘suitcase’ has served him well. I know he has all the tools he needs to achieve the average needed for the university of his choice. It’s all up to him. Just one more semester to go.

My hope now for Michael and all youth out there with food allergies embarking on their new paths…universal acceptance.

Times are changing…the more society, immediate family, friends, peers, and educational establishments recognize the importance of embracing our children with food allergies…the easier it will be for these students to achieve their personal goals.

Hope, support, choice, faith and change have played a major role throughout Michael’s journey. They have made him who he is today…a young man with big dreams with the self-esteem, ability and opportunity to reach them…and one proud mom!

Joining My Boys With Food Allergies High School School Council

Well, I finally did it…I joined my boys’ high school School Council. After 3 years of their Vice-Principal, now the Principal, inviting me to join…I felt that this year was the year to do it.

Michael’s upcoming Graduation played a big part in my decision. Graduation events planned for the 2013/2014 year…an Annual Graduation Christmas Dinner, Graduation Day and of course, The Prom.  As each of these Graduation events involve food, research will be needed to determine a plan of action due to Michael’s food allergies to dairy, egg, beef, lamb, fish, shellfish, sesame, peanut/tree nuts, mustard and raspberries. I felt the best option for me, as a parent of children with food allergies, to figure out all the Graduation events was to get ‘on board’ and join the School Council.

“Why?”, might you say, “did I not join sooner?”  Well, each and every parent of a child/children with or without food allergies will have their own reasons for joining or not joining a School Council. Personally, I felt I needed a purpose/goal to commit myself…the idea of raising awareness of anaphylaxis to set into motion some safe-guards at Graduation events for students with food allergies gave me reason to join.

Over the years, I have been building a rapport with the Vice Principal/Principal, office staff and teachers in regards to setting up both Michael and Matthew’s Anaphylactic Emergency Plan and Medical Profile for their respective teachers and to raise more of an awareness of anaphylaxis in the school setting. When Michael started in Grade 9, there was not a system in place for the students with food allergies that met with Sabrina’s Law…now, office staff and teachers are fully aware and up to date.

Joining the School Council gives me the opportunity to reach out and raise awareness about food allergies in another forum. Michael’s unique list of food allergies continues to label us as trailblazers. It has opened the door to many educational moments…hopefully, paving the way for other students living with food allergies.

So, how has my presence at School Council regarding the raising awareness of food allergies at Graduation events progressed thus far?  I am happy to report…great!

School Council and the teachers with whom I have dealt with so far have been very accommodating…they seem very interested in the inclusion and safety of all students.

The first Graduation event was the Annual Graduation Christmas Dinner whereby, the Principal, Vice Principals and teachers put together a turkey dinner complete with stuffing, mashed potatoes and veggies for the graduating class…all cooked at the school during the day for the evening event.

Due to fact that the meal included some of Michael’s food allergens and the risk of cross-contamination in the kitchen was high…I decided to cook a complete turkey dinner for Michael at home to bring to the event.

One teacher was in charge of organizing the event.  We emailed each other in great detail…I even offered to bake Mini Dairy, Egg and Peanut/Tree Nut Free Vanilla and Chocolate Cupcakes for the graduating class’s dessert.

All was set until I received an email from the teacher in charge that Michael had not purchased a ticket. Apparently, Michael had not heard the announcements to purchase tickets and he had missed the deadline. After consulting with his friends…he decided not to go as not many of them were attending. It was his choice…too bad, because I hear it was quite the event!

Michael may have missed out on the event of the year…but at least the school is now aware of the possibility of students with food allergies attending such events.

I must say, I am enjoying my time at School Council. Should I have joined earlier? Perhaps, but I am here now and that is all that matters.

Next up…Graduation Day snacks and the main event…dinner at a Golf Club before the Prom.

For parents of a child/children with food allergies…Have you joined the School Council?  If yes, what has been your experience?  If no, are you considering it?

Anaphylaxis Canada Launches Free Allergy App For Teens

Oh happy day! Anaphylaxis Canada has just launched a free ‘Allergy App For Teens’. Click here to read all about the new app.

Having just upgraded to an iPhone, I was super excited to upload this free app from ‘Apple’s App Store’. Just search for the term “Why Risk It?”. The app is available for both the iPhone and iPad, as well as, phones and tablets that run on the Android and Blackberry operating systems. Just check their respective app stores.

Not only does Anaphylaxis Canada’s ‘Allergy App For Teens’ contain all the pertinent information all allergenic youth need regarding anaphylaxis but it also contains a direct link to the “Why Risk It? Teen Allergy Blog”. A great source for allergenic youth to read about the lives of other youth with allergies.

I will certainly be bringing it to the attention of my boys’ high school principal and at the next Parent Council (I finally joined this year).  Anaphylaxis Canada’s ‘Allergy App For Teens’ is the perfect educational tool for all teachers. It gives teachers quick, easy access to refresh their memories with information on “What is Anaphylaxis?, Symptoms, Treatment and FAQ’s”, as well as, information on “Why Risk It?” and a link to their blog.

Have you downloaded Anaphylaxis Canada’s ‘ Allergy App For Teens’ yet?

P.S.  Just to let you know…I have not dropped off the face of the earth. lol  Living, breathing, shopping, cooking and talking about food allergies 24/7 can become quite overwhelming.  I think I just needed a break from writing about it.

With my eldest son, Michael, heading off to university next year, there is much to think about…a new stage in all of our lives.  Michael’s journey towards ‘independent living’ and my journey of learning to ‘let go’.

Coming soon, I will be writing about this new chapter in our lives.

Allerject Educational Materials For All Ontario School and Public Health Units

Did you know…all Ontario Schools and Public Health Units will have received educational material regarding the latest auto-injector Allerject?

Anaphylaxis Canada,  in collaboration with the Ontario Ministry of Education, have updated their Anaphylaxis Support Kits with packages containing resources to inform and educate our educators on the Allerject. Click here for the announcement at Anaphylaxis Canada.

Minister of Education, Liz Sandals, stated, “The health and well-being of our students is a top priority for the Ontario government.”  “Together with our partners, we are committed to making our schools healthier places for students to learn and grow.”

I am more than thrilled!

The resources in Anaphylaxis Canada’s Support Kit support Sabrina’s Law…passed May 2005, Bill 3 and effective January 1, 2006.  Sabrina’s Law “requires that every school board in Ontario establish and maintain an anaphylaxis policy”...it also “requires that principals develop individual plans for pupils at risk of anaphylaxis.”

Ontario publicly funded schools, school boards and public health units received their first bilingual Anaphylaxis Support Kits in 2011…they will receive Updated Packages, whereas, new schools and public health units will have received the full packages.

The bilingual Anaphylaxis Support Kit includes epinephrine auto-injector training devices (EpiPen and Allerject), awareness and instructional posters and videos, a presentation for school personnel, as well as, related materials and other information.

Educating our educators on anaphylaxis is key to the safety of our children with anaphylaxis in their journey through the education system.

I truly believe the next step is to include the students themselves…our children with anaphylaxis’ classmates.

I know from experience with my two boys with multiple food allergies…the importance of educating their classmates on their food allergies and explaining, in age-appropriate language, the causes, signs and symptoms and treatment of anaphylaxis.

I believe…de-mystifying auto-injectors and developing an awareness of anaphylaxis early on has many benefits. 1)  It would increase a student’s understanding of a classmate with anaphylaxis. 2)  Develop an appreciation of their classmates living with anaphylaxis. 3)  Build a support network of educators and students for classmates with anaphylaxis.

I am every so grateful for the continuing compassion, empathy and support from my boys’ classmates and educators throughout their education journey.

Classmates are on the ‘front-line’…they are the most likely to witness the onset of an anaphylactic reaction. Students educated on the causes, signs and symptoms and treatment of anaphylaxis would be prepared to administer an auto-injector in the event of an anaphylactic reaction…saving precious time.

A recent article, “It’s Hard Not to Stare children’s book opens discussion on disabilities” by Andrea Gordon in the Toronto Star supports my theory of capitalizing on educating students early to embrace all their classmates, regardless of their differences. Click here to view the article.

Author Tim Huff’s latest children’s book, “It’s Hard Not To Stare: Helping Children Understand Disabilities” and his first book, “The Cardboard Shack Beneath The Bridge”, both touch on this very concept.

Tim Huff’s goal…”to demystify the unfamiliar, build empathy and prevent the kind of judgement and meanness he has witnessed during his decades working with the disabled and as an outreach worker on the street with youth.”

Tim Huff, co-founder of Street Level…”a national advocacy network on homelessness and poverty issues “ states, “If we teach children to be compassionate when they’re young it spills over to everything  and affects their character.”

He goes on to say, “At a time when bullying is rampant, it makes more sense to build on the positive by instilling compassion and dealing with kids’ questions or uncertainty about the unfamiliar, rather than simply outlawing behaviours through numerous anti-bullying programs.”

I totally agree…perhaps a children’s book focusing on anaphylaxis should be next in the works!

Now there is some food for thought.

P.S. Upon learning of Anaphylaxis Canada’s Updated Packages…I photocopied their media release to give to my boys’ high school principal.

Unique Opportunity For Teenagers With Food Allergies…Food Allergy Cooking Classes

I am very excited to announce a unique opportunity for teenagers with food allergies…Food Allergy Cooking Classes!

The Town of Whitby’s (Ontario) 2013 Fall Activity Guide is offering Food Allergy Cooking Classes to youth 15+…click here for a link.

The Food Allergy Cooking Classes will focus on:

- how to read ingredient lists for their food allergens
– cross-contamination in the kitchen
– how to adapt a recipe to meet their food allergens
- how to follow a recipe
– hands on experience creating delicious food allergy friendly foods

Preparing youth with food allergies to be independent in the kitchen with basic cooking skills is an essential basic need.

Our youth with food allergies will one day be moving on…giving them the basic tools to create allergy friendly foods for themselves is a lesson worth giving.

I am happy to announce that I will be teaching the classes…so excited!

This is a great opportunity for youth with food allergies to get together, socialize, learn some life long kitchen skills, enjoy some great tasting allergy friendly food and realize they are not alone on their journey.

If you have food allergies and live in the Durham, Ontario area…this course is for you!

Have you ever taken a Food Allergy Cooking Class? How was it?  What did you learn?
Are there Food Allergy Cooking Classes in your area?  Have you ever considered signing up for one?
If you could take a Food Allergy Cooking Class…what would you hope to learn from it?

I would love to get your feedback to help me prepare for the Food Allergy Cooking Classes…thank you.

Back To School With Anaphylaxis 2013

Well it is that time of year again…time to think about heading back to school.

As both my boys are anaphylactic and have asthma…I will be updating, if need be, their Emergency Medical Plans (provided by the school), writing a letter to the school staff outlining their specific medical conditions…food allergies and asthma…and creating a quick reference Emergency Medical Form for their teachers and substitute teachers (provided by Anaphylaxis Canada see below) and a quick reference Asthma Action Plan (provided by the Canadian Lung Association…click here for a link.)

My eldest starting grade 12…dairy, eggs, beef, lamb, fish, shellfish, peanut/tree nuts, sesame, mustard and raspberries and my youngest starting grade 10…peanut/tree nuts.

Anaphylaxis Canada makes my job easier by outlining some key resources for me to review:

1)  An online webinar:  Back to School – How to Manage Allergies This School Season…click here.
2)  Parent Checklist:  Key reminders for parents and students…click here.
3)  School Staff Checklist:  An overview for educators and school staff…click here.
4)  Information for Teens and Young Adults:  Why Risk It? …a teen site for safety and management tips…click here.

My personal favourite this year…a one page Emergency Medical Plan Form. This form quickly identifies my boys with their photo, list of food allergies, auto-injector information/expiry date/location, signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction, procedure to follow during an anaphylactic reaction, and emergency contact information.

The one page Emergency Medical Plan Form is easy to fill out, easy to read, and acts as a quick reference for each of my boys’ teachers to have on hand for their file, for the substitute teacher’s file, for the staff room and main office. Click here for a link. Click here for a link for more of Anaphylaxis Canada’s list of Helpful Info.

Personally, I think the more information we offer to educate our educators and the students that interact with our children with anaphylaxis on a daily basis…the better.

As parents of children or students with anaphylaxis…we cannot totally rely on the school systems to be up-to-date on the ongoing progresses in the ‘world of anaphylaxis.’

It is up to us…as parents/caregivers…to continue to be advocates for our children with anaphylaxis.

With the onus on us…as parents/caregivers…setting a good example by teaching our children with anaphylaxis to becoming advocates for themselves.

We need to learn to ‘pass the torch’…giving our children with anaphylaxis the opportunity to be confident, independent, contributing members of society.

As parents of a child/children with anaphylaxis…what will you be doing to get ready to send your child/children off to school?

As a student with anaphylaxis…what will you be doing you do to get ready to start a new school year?

Click here to read about how EpipenPrincess at A Tale of Anaphylaxis is preparing for Grade 12 with anaphylaxis with her post on ‘Back To School Basics’.

Anaphylaxis Canada Launches Exciting New Program For Teens: The Allergy Awareness Challenge

Today, August 28, 2013, Anaphylaxis Canada is launching an exciting new program for teens…The Allergy Awareness Challenge.

Check it out…click here for a link.

The Allergy Awareness Challenge was designed by teens for teens…Anaphylaxis Canada’s Youth Advisory Panel...helped to design all the games and materials.

The Allergy Awareness Challenge is an educational tool for teens which specifically focuses on spreading the word about anaphylaxis through three fun days of interactive challenges:

1)  Adopt An Allergy
2)  Food Allergy Jeopardy
3)  Food Allergy Spelling Bee

The Allergy Awareness Challenge is student run with all the materials provided by Anaphylaxis Canada…free!

I would really love your feedback on Anaphylaxis Canada’s Allergy Awareness Challenge.

Parents, caregivers, students…is it something you would consider proposing to your school?

I know I will definitely be informing my boys high school about this unique opportunity.